Books

Book Promotion: Charon Unguarded

Book Promotion: Charon UnguardedCharon Unguarded by A.H. Johnstone
Genres: Mythology, Fantasy

Ra has finally worked out how to escape the mortal world, the only problem is that he can't do it without help, and Loki isn't the most reliable of gods, in fact, he's far from it.

Charon, a one-time Ferryman of the Underworld, is now the doorman of a ‘disused’ office block, and he’s onto Ra’s plan. If only the gods hadn’t lost that drunken bet all those centuries ago, things would be very different. For a start, Ragnarök wouldn’t be on its way.

Maybe Charon is the only one who’s noticed. It seems like he’s the only one to care, but can he do anything about it? He’s going to try, but there are others who might profit from the situation, and the last thing he needs is to be caught defying a direct order from the Fae to stay out of it.

Charon Unguarded is a whimsical, mythology-based fiction and the first book in the Ferryman Saga.

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Regular Price: $2.99

Discounted Price to 31st July: $0.99

(Please check the price prior to downloading)

 

 

Iris by Andrew Gates

Iris by Andrew GatesIris (The Color of Water and Sky, #1) by Andrew Gates

Year 200, Atlantic Federation Calendar. It has been two full centuries since the surface of the Earth was destroyed and humanity retreated to the bottom of the ocean. No one is old enough to remember the world outside the station they now call home. Life is peaceful in this artificial world. There is no war. Crime is low. But questions are raised once an experimental submarine is attacked during a routine test mission. The enemy is unknown. There are no leads. For the first time in generations, a long isolated city will have to confront what may lurk above the surface.
"With the scope of Game of Thrones, and the feel of Asimov, it’s destined to become your new SciFi addiction." - Readcommendations
Iris is the first book in the Color of Water and Sky series by Andrew Gates.

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My Review

Iris is a character driven story that takes place entirely in the depths of the ocean. The last of mankind fled to the bottom of the sea after the land became too toxic for human survival. It begins with an explorative expedition with two navy personnel, charged with the task of testing out a new submarine, and I have to confess to being drawn into Iris midway through this first chapter.

Reading on, I found the pacing in the next few chapters rather slow, and very nearly put the book in my DNF (did not finish) folder. A good friend of mine loved this book though, so I persevered, skipping through the parts that I didn’t think really added anything to the story (mainly backstory and excess exposition, plus one whole chapter that could quite easily have been cut out with no detriment to the worldbuilding or characterisation). But, I’m glad I stuck with Iris because it really is a very good story.

It’s multi-pov, providing different perspectives and experiences of the people living in the underground habitat. Iris, of course, is the main pov character, and through her, our eyes are opened to the society around her (and the others). In many ways, there is little difference to the kind of society we know, but being underwater requires a more totalitarian style government. What may come across as necessary rules to some, is seen as oppression by others. As events unfold, and discoveries are made, it challenges everything these characters think they might know about their past, present. and potential future.

Iris is a page turner (once I was past the earlier chapters) and I honestly had a hard time putting it down in the latter part of the book and right up to the end. There are plenty of twists and turns and surprises, and I, for one, am looking forward to reading the second book in this series: Kholvaria

 

 

Stormhaven Rising by Eric Michael Craig

Stormhaven Rising by Eric Michael CraigStormhaven Rising (Atlas and the Winds #1) by Eric Michael Craig

How far will a president go to keep a possible world-ending disaster secret, and how far can a wealthy industrialist go to make sure the truth gets out?Facing a global catastrophe, Colton Taylor, finds himself locked into a collision course with the US Government as he tries to save humanity from destruction.Forcing himself into the arena of international politics, Taylor struggles to maneuver his corporate empire into position to give civilization a fighting chance.Stormhaven Rising sets the foundation for the cataclysmic battle between human ego and the relentless nature of destiny... A battle where the price of failure, is no less than the end of Civilization.
Book One of Atlas and the Winds

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My Review

I should begin this review by saying that I am totally fascinated by the whole ‘asteroid heading to Earth’ concept. I’ve watched numerous films and read every work of fiction I can featuring asteroids in this very scenario, so when Stormhaven Rising was recommended to me, I jumped at the chance to read it.

Stormhaven Rising isn’t a rehashed ‘Hollywood saves the world’ type story. It has science – real science – and dispels many of the myths we have seen on the big screen. It had an interesting start and was quick to set up the basics of the story and introduce some key characters, and of course the science. I’m not very knowledgeable about advanced science (anything beyond what is taught general science in high school), so when reading a hard sci-fi, I tend to prefer the plot over the science, but in the same respect, I like to learn new things. I certainly learned a lot from reading Stormhaven Rising and for the most part, understood it.

The crux of this story is the government trying to keep knowledge of the oncoming asteroid out of the public domain, and Colton Taylor, an industrialist with seeming unlimited resources, trying to do the exact opposite. I found the character dynamics interesting for the most part. There were parts that went aover my head, or went on for a little longer than I felt necessary, but overall, I enjoyed the story.

This is the first book in the Atlas and the Winds series gives an insight into how the powers that be may react in such a situation versus those who believe people have a right to know.

If you enjoy hard sci-fi, then I would certainly recommend added Stormhaven Rising to your ‘to be read’ list.

 

 

 

A Space Story – The Journal of a Bald Little Alien Named Dean Kilmer

A Space Story – The Journal of a Bald Little Alien Named Dean KilmerA Space Story - The Journal of a Bald Little Alien Named Dean Kilmer by Tig Carson
Series: A Space Story
Genres: Aliens, Young Adult
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When a bald little alien named Dean heads out in search of Earth,
he’s shocked to discover he’s not the only one looking for a way there.

Follow Dean as he befriends the most feared creature in the galaxy,
gets hunted by killer monsters, reveals ancient mysteries,
and eats way too much fake bacon.A Space Story tells the tale of a bald little alien called Dean Kilmer and his quest to not only find Earth, but convince a human to return to his home with him.

[divider]Written in the first person, it is Dean who tells us the story. A brief introduction to how things have been and how things are now (and it is brief) provides the reader with ample knowledge to dive head first into the story. Fate intervenes in his quest  and he achieves what no other has – he meets ‘her’ – a formidable Earthling ‘dressed in her fabled patchwork armour.’

Written with the young adult genre in mind, A Space Story starts in medias res, so there’s no sitting around waiting for things to happen. By the end of the first chapter, the reader has a good idea of the characterisation of both Dean and ‘her,’ the landscape, the quest and the stakes. There’s a great balance of narration and dialogue while the interaction between the two initial characters is highly engaging.

I’ve only taken a quick read through the first chapter, but I enjoyed what I read. I thought the writing was very good too, the sentences were a nice length, tight and to the point, and I believe it would appeal to a young adult reader. I, in the meantime, shall be adding this to my ‘want-to-read’ list on Goodreads.

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